Irving Texas Outlaws Sharia Law

Posted: March 21, 2015 in Politics

IRVING (CBSDFW.COM) – Dozens of Muslims in Irving are upset after the city council passed a resolution in support of a new state house bill some Muslims believe targets their faith.

Council members voted Thursday night on a resolution that support Texas HB 562, which forbids the use of foreign law and codifies the supremacy of U.S. and state law.

“I think it’s the most disgraceful day in the city of Irving,” said Omar Suleiman, an Irving resident who is Muslim. “The elephant in the room is that it’s the anti-Shariah bill.”

Some Muslims in Irving believe the resolution is in reaction to a new Islamic Tribunal that is operating in the city.

Judges had previously told community members their work is non-binding and they only deal with civil disputes like marriage. They also said U.S. and state laws supersede any decisions they make.

“This bill does not mention at all Muslims, Shariah Law, Islam, even religion,” said Mayor Beth Van Duyne.

Mayor Beth Van Duyne said it is important to recognize the constitution and unite behind U.S. and Texas laws.

“Respect them, obey them, embrace them,” said the mayor.
Many Muslims said all they can do is take use their feelings the next time they vote.

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Comments
  1. John Allman says:

    Many multi-national companies have terms and conditions in their contracts with customers worldwide, for example hire purchase agreements or cell phone rental contracts, that include clauses such as, “This contract is to be construed in accordance with the laws of [X]”, where X is the name of a jurisdiction, for example, “The state of California”, “The United States of America”, or “England”. Is the Bill mentioned going to make such clauses null and void?

    If the Bill even said what this video tries to imply, it ought not to affect the operation of private tribunals that apply systems of laws, rules and procedures such as the bible (in church discipline proceedings against a delinquent church leader who has had an affair, or embezzled money from the church), the Talmud, Sharia, the rules of a club, or the school rules of a school, or an employer’s complaints procedure, or a university’s anti-harassment procedures, unless such private arrangements import, lock stock and barrel, the statute book and case law and Common law or Roman law of a particular foreign nation state. I imagine that Native American *communities*, and perhaps some Native American individuals integrated into mixed communities, willingly submit to judicial systems that are a legacy of the days when these nations had the territory now called the USA to themselves.

    The countries called Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia etc did not exist when Sharia law was started. It isn’t exactly a “foreign” system of law, is it?

    The Bill sounds to be likely to change nothing. According to the report, if one listens carefully, the Bill merely codifies in statute, what judges in every country of the world have been saying for centuries, when faced by a plaintiff disgruntled by the decision of a private club committee, or a religious court, or a tribal court, or the decision of a village’s elders. One party is dissatisfied with how his faith community or tribal community’s informal court adjudicated. The state is not bound to follow the informal court’s decision. It will look at the dispute with fresh eyes, and apply the law of the land.

    There is no need for the Bill. For a thousand years, the law of the land has trumped even the Ten Commandments, ever since the modern nation state evolved. But there isn’t much harm in the Bill either. It merely “codifies” (enshrines in an unnecessary statute) the status quo.

    The role of (for example) Sharia law isn’t to modify the law of the land. It is mere evidence as to the intentions of two parties, both of them Muslims, as to the likely implied terms of a contract between them that has ended in tears, leaving one party feeling litigious even after a Sharia court has given its non-binding opinion.

    Like

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