Posts Tagged ‘Sensor’

Mastercard is testing a smartphone app that uses facial recognition to verify online purchases. Users in the trial can hold their phone up as though taking a selfie to approve transactions.

“The new generation, which is into selfies… I think they’ll find it cool,” the firm’s security expert Ajay Bhalla told CNN.

One security expert told the BBC facial recognition should be complemented with “extra layers of security”.

“Google tried facial recognition on Android phones and there were a lot of problems in the early days”, said Ken Munro, security researcher at Pen Test Partners.

“People realised you could take a photo of somebody and present it to the camera, and the phone would unlock.”

Spoofed

Google admits its facial recognition is “less secure than a pattern, PIN or password” on the website for one of its devices.

Mastercard’s app asks users to blink to prove that they are human, but even this has been spoofed in the past.

Full Story @ [BBC]

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A new infrared police license plate reader system called the Data Driver Approach to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDCAT) can spy on nearly a million license plates in a two-month span. The video below shows DDCAT’s in use in Idaho

DDCAT’s are being used by police across the country, they’re in NJ, NY, Boston and California to name a few.

Police departments are regurgitating DHS propaganda from the NHTSA’s website:

DDACTS integrates location-based crime and traffic crash data to determine the most effective methods for deploying law enforcement and other resources. Drawing on the deterrent value of highly visible traffic enforcement and the knowledge that crimes often involve motor vehicles, the goal of DDACTS is to reduce crime, crashes, and traffic violations across the country.

There it is in black & white taxpayers are spending $11 THOUSAND per police vehicle so police can look for traffic violators! Ask yourself a question if you spent $11k per car how can law enforcement (DHS) hope to recoup the expenses? By affixing them to intersections, police cars and waiting for you to commit a traffic violation.

Welcome to American profiteering I mean policing, where your next violation WILL cost you!

Full Story @ [massprivatei]

circuit-board-layout

Any system that is connected to the Internet is always subject to threats, no matter how well it is protected. This assumption is well known to any teenager today. No software barriers can fully prevent human errors in a program code or user behavior.

That’s why devices that have functions of special importance, or that contain top-secret information, are usually not connected to the Internet. It is always better to accept inconvenience than face unpleasant consequences. This is how, for example, control systems for large industrial objects or some bank computers are protected.

It may seem that going offline completely will keep any secret safe: if there is no Internet, then there is no data leakage. However, that is not the case. Remote data transfer techniques adopted by secret services long time ago become more accessible each year to ‘commercial’ users. Quite a few spy gadgets at James Bond’s disposal are becoming commonplace today.

Electromagnetic spying

Any operational device that is connected to a power line generates electromagnetic radiation that can be intercepted by proven technologies. Almost half a century ago, state security services of the U.S. and the USSR were concerned with such leakages, and the information that has been obtained since those days is massive. Some parts of the American activity are known under the TEMPEST abbreviation, and some declassified archives reads as good as detective novels.

Despite the long history, new methods of ‘surfing’ electromagnetic waves appear regularly as the electrical equipment evolves. In the past, the weakest links were CRT monitors and unshielded VGA cables that produced electromagnetic noise. Keyboards have become favorite toys for data security researchers over the past few years. The research in this area has been steadily productive. These are just a few examples.

Keystrokes can be remotely tracked with high accuracy at the 67-feet (20-meter) distance by using a homemade device that analyzes the radio spectrum and costs around $5,000. It is interesting to note that the attack is equally effective against common cheap USB keyboards, expensive wireless keyboards with a signal encryption, and built-in notebook keyboards.

All of the devices work on the same principle and generate electromagnetic noise. The difference is stipulated by the signal power, which depends upon the length of the data transmission wire (it is the shortest for notebooks).
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Graffiti on public transport is a problem the world over. But Sydney is having dramatic success at reducing the amount of graffiti on its trains by using a chemical sensor.