Posts Tagged ‘Tradecraft’

VICE News ran a story about a gang in Detroit, Michigan that was nabbed partly due to their use of social media. This of course caught my attention so I clicked the link to the indictment papers and began to have a read. I find court documents completely fascinating. It’s a weird hobby I will admit. However, I am always one of those people that likes to read more into a story, dig for background, and understand more of the peripheral players, locations and other details. Indictment papers are one of those documents that can help you do all of this. Aside from learning far more about news stories that interest you, this can be exceedingly useful if you are in law enforcement or you’re a journalist and a particular story pops up that interests you. Sometimes digging through a completely different case than one you’re currently working on can give you ideas, or help to hone some of your search skills. As well, a lot of folks taking OSINT training have a tough time finding something to apply their skills to, they can only creep on their own accounts or friends for so long before it becomes boring and repetitive.

There are cases where you can write code to kick off the whole process (such as what I did with Bin Ladin’s Bookshelf) but there are other times that you are going to want to spend some time figuring out where to target your automation. This requires a bit of critical reading, and an eye for extracting relevant pieces of information. Let’s use these indictment papers and do some quick Twitter investigating to see if we can locate other interesting people potentially associated to the folks that are locked up.

Full Story @ [Automating OSINT]

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nato-ground-surveillance

The evening proceeded quietly. The dark drama I experienced earlier was like a strong dose of caffeine that began to wear off. At around 11:30 that evening I went to bed hoping to capture some of the sleep stolen from me the night before. All was quiet . . . but not for long. At exactly 12:00 midnight I was rudely awakened by a sudden eruption of clamor from the apartment above! They’re back! The Scowler (or his henchmen) had returned!

This assault was a perfect replica of what I endured the night before. The noise, stomping, and loud profane voices bounced off my bedroom walls. I now faced a second night of stolen sleep and harassment. What should I do? If law enforcement agents are my antagonists, what would happen if I called the police to complain? I did not want a confrontation, just a good night’s sleep.

Forced to lay awake for the second night in a row by this assault, I began to analyze my situation. This scheme was not the improvised efforts of a ragtag group of local police officers. I sensed that it was a well-crafted, thoroughly rehearsed technique that reflected expertise in psychology and surveillance. The participants knew their roles well and stuck to a script.

Rather than beat me physically, they were seeking to beat me by attacking my emotions and injuring my pride. I had been rudely deprived of sleep for over 36 hours. Also, I was subject to a series of actions designed to humiliate me and provoke an angered response. They had also provided a target for my anger . . . the “Scowler.”

This gang-stalking methodology falls under a system of psychological operations being developed and tested on American citizens by covert quasi-military law enforcement agencies. The basic process described above has been taught by the CIA (Central Intelligence Agency) since the 1950’s. “The purpose of all coercive techniques is to induce psychological regression in the subject by bringing a superior outside force to bear on his will to resist. Regression is basically . . . a reversion to an earlier behavioral level. As the subject regresses, his learned personality traits fall away in reverse chronological order. He begins to lose the capacity to carry out the highest creative activities, to deal with complex situations, to cope with stressful interpersonal relationships, or to cope with repeated frustrations.” – CIA Human Resource Exploitation Manual

Full Story @ [youarenotmybigbrother]

The above article is actually taken from a now defunct website that was captured by the Way Back Machine.

circuit-board-layout

Any system that is connected to the Internet is always subject to threats, no matter how well it is protected. This assumption is well known to any teenager today. No software barriers can fully prevent human errors in a program code or user behavior.

That’s why devices that have functions of special importance, or that contain top-secret information, are usually not connected to the Internet. It is always better to accept inconvenience than face unpleasant consequences. This is how, for example, control systems for large industrial objects or some bank computers are protected.

It may seem that going offline completely will keep any secret safe: if there is no Internet, then there is no data leakage. However, that is not the case. Remote data transfer techniques adopted by secret services long time ago become more accessible each year to ‘commercial’ users. Quite a few spy gadgets at James Bond’s disposal are becoming commonplace today.

Electromagnetic spying

Any operational device that is connected to a power line generates electromagnetic radiation that can be intercepted by proven technologies. Almost half a century ago, state security services of the U.S. and the USSR were concerned with such leakages, and the information that has been obtained since those days is massive. Some parts of the American activity are known under the TEMPEST abbreviation, and some declassified archives reads as good as detective novels.

Despite the long history, new methods of ‘surfing’ electromagnetic waves appear regularly as the electrical equipment evolves. In the past, the weakest links were CRT monitors and unshielded VGA cables that produced electromagnetic noise. Keyboards have become favorite toys for data security researchers over the past few years. The research in this area has been steadily productive. These are just a few examples.

Keystrokes can be remotely tracked with high accuracy at the 67-feet (20-meter) distance by using a homemade device that analyzes the radio spectrum and costs around $5,000. It is interesting to note that the attack is equally effective against common cheap USB keyboards, expensive wireless keyboards with a signal encryption, and built-in notebook keyboards.

All of the devices work on the same principle and generate electromagnetic noise. The difference is stipulated by the signal power, which depends upon the length of the data transmission wire (it is the shortest for notebooks).
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Washington, DC (TFC) – Interrogation is now commonplace in the United States. It may not be in room with a hot light, it may not be in a detention center. It may not be under torture. It may be something as simple as questioning on the side of the road. It may be by a private individual and not a law enforcement officer. The first rule of dealing with cops: don’t. Ask for your lawyer, and keep your mouth shut. However, there are scenarios in which law enforcement is operating outside the scope of the law or the person interrogating you isn’t law enforcement. The techniques used during effective interrogation are the same whether you are dealing with a local cop, a federal agent, an insurgent group, a foreign intelligence service, or a kidnapper. Understanding the tactics makes you much less susceptible to them. The tactics will be discussed and the reader will be given a mantra to repeat after each question is asked and the most basic technique of defeating it. There will be follow-up article to discuss more advanced methods of turning the situation to your advantage and gaining intelligence while being interrogated.

We Know Everything:
This is one of the most common methods. You are shown a thick file or multiple files. The interrogator begins reading information from the file. You hear your birthdate, mother and father’s names, where you were at earlier in the morning you were captured, you might even be shown a photo from years before to demonstrate how long you’ve been under surveillance. Most of the file is empty. They know where you were earlier because they followed you prior to abducting you. The photo was pulled from your friend’s Facebook page and then it was cropped flipped and zoomed in on to distort it from the original photo.
Mantra to defeat the technique: If they knew everything, they wouldn’t be talking to you.
Method to defeat the technique: Silence.

Full Story @ [thefifthcolumnnews]